Who and What We Are

Xerography Debt is a review zine for zine readers by zine writers (and readers). It is a hybrid of review zine and personal zine (the ancestor to many blogs). The paper version has been around since 1999. This blog thing is are attempt to bridge the gap between Web 2.0 and Paper 1.0. Print is not dead, but it is becoming more pixelated.

Thursday, March 19, 2015

NODE PAJOMO (Winter 2014)

review from Anne: NODE PAJOMO (Winter 2014)

28 pages, (1/2 page) 4.25 inches x 5.5 inches, 3 US /5 Can/ Mex / World. ?  trades. Cash (US or equivalent or unusued US stamps -- "stamps preferred!")
POB 2632 Bellingham, WA 98227-2632
Free editions of just listings available upon request. Listings due by the 15th of June and December
Issues published around first of July and January.
MAILART. ZINES. LIFE. reads the tagline for this zine, but there's a warning in there as well: "Herein you will find a ton of zine reviews, a few stone of audio reviews, and only half a kilo of mail art listings. The emigration of mail artists to the internet has been detrimental to those whose inclinations are exclusively postal. We understand the attraction of social media, but prefer it tangible not digital. Your mileage may vary." That said, there's a CD inside of this zine that's a collection of audio mail art as well as other inserts and other interesting things. I don't know if this zine will continue (it sounds like they aren't totally sure if they will as well, so...), but it's pretty interesting conceptually. If it IS the last issue, I would recommend that you check it out before it vanishes -- there's a little bit of everything in here, and it's worth a look.

COPY THIS! #10

review from Anne: COPY THIS! #10 (Dec 2014)

40 pages, (1/4 page) 4.25 inches x 5.5 inches, ? US /? Can/ Mex / World. ?  trades.
D. Blake Werts 12339 Chesley Drive Charlotte NC 28277
bwets@vnet.net


COPY THIS! is a compilation zine with an ALL ART issue planned for January. #10 is mostly a long and very detailed interview with Steve Lafler, but also includes and news & updates from people in the zine community about their various projects and interesting things that are happening...and it comes with rad trading cards! (I'll save the surprise, but if you like Steve Lafler, you'll totally dig the cards.). This zine is pretty straightforward and the layout is very crisp and clear, and though the interview is the bulk of the issue, it's really well done and specific. It's a lively interview and worth reading.

Monday, March 16, 2015

Cabildo Quarterly #7 / Dead of Winter 2015

review from Anne: Cabildo Quarterly #7 / Dead of Winter 2015


2 pages, 18 x 20 folded to pamphlet size, $1 US (Can/Mex ? trades ?)
cabildoquarterly@gmail.com
cabildoquartlery.tumbler.com
PO Box 784 Belchertown MA 01007

A short review for a short zine: poetry, short stories (very short), other items of note. More updates online; clean layout, no frills.  The construction might seem simple but the writing is interesting and intricate. There are worse ways to spend a buck and postage, folks. It you like it literary, check out this one.

BROOKLYN #86 and #87

review from Anne: BROOKLYN #86 and #87

24 pages, 5.5 x 8.5 $10 for a 4 issue subscription
(PAYMENT IN CASH! Fred adds: US currency please!)
Fred Argoff
Penthouse L
1170 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn NY 11230

OMG, SO MUCH BROOKLYN! More Brooklyn reviews! Say it with me, people: “The name of this zine is BROOKLYN and that's also what the zine is about, Fred's beloved borough of Brooklyn."

If you've been reading my reviews for a while, you should be pretty familiar with BROOKLYN by now. I love that these always appear in my mailbox and I'm always curious as to what Fred will use for stamps -- usually Brooklyn-related zazzle.com stamps. If you're new to all this, you should know that  Brooklyn is always a combination of history, photography, and other Brooklyn related things, and it's a long-standing awesome series that's a fun read even if you're not a NY resident.

#86 is a special issue. The Brooklyn Industrial Special Issue, thank you very much! There's some history, a lot of photography, and interesting facts. #87...is also a special issue! "When I was busy gathering material for the special theme issue about Bushwick, the possibility of a sequel was the furthest thing from my mind," writes Fred. "But, as often happens in the course of zine research, you never know exactly where it's going to lead. I wound up with more material than was necessary at the time. And then I thought, 'Well, since it's all here in one place at the same time...'" So in reading both back to back, you get a lot of information about Fred's favorite borough, but the neat thing is that BROOKLYN's at number 87! I can't imagine what Fred's got up his sleeve for #100!  #87 also includes the ever-hilarious Brooklyn Lexicon & Pronounciation Guide, which is totally one of my favorite things about this series. (i.e. You haven't subscribed yet? Wat the hell? You crazy, or wat?)

Always, always a fun read worth your time. So, whaddya waitin' for? Read some Brooklyn already!

Sunday, March 15, 2015

A VERY BRIEF HISTORY OF BUTTONS #1


review from Anne: A VERY BRIEF HISTORY OF BUTTONS #1


24 pages, 9.25 X 12.5, $15 US (shipping included)
BusyBeaver/net/button-zine.html


Honestly, this zine is one of the fanciest zines that's ever appeared in my mailbox. I've been a longtime fan of Busy Beaver buttons, and I love the idea that there's a button museum of rad buttons. This zine's an interesting, clever romp through the history of the pinback button (well, even before: the zine's got images of a historical Abraham Lincoln pre-button!).  Busy Beaver owner Christen Carter and production manager Joel Carter, who co-wrote the zine in collaboration, wanted to focus on how buttons are artifacts of cultural history. It's also got some pretty substantial production values: I know $15 sounds like a lot of money, and for most zines it is, but when you're looking at this and holding it in your hands, it reads more like a museum's exhibition catalogue. It's expertly designed and the captions are hilarious. It's a great read, especially if you're interested in history and material culture.