Who and What We Are

Xerography Debt is a review zine for zine readers by zine writers (and readers). It is a hybrid of review zine and personal zine (the ancestor to many blogs). The paper version has been around since 1999. This blog thing is are attempt to bridge the gap between Web 2.0 and Paper 1.0. Print is not dead, but it is becoming more pixelated.

Sunday, April 23, 2017

INDESTRUCTIBLE: Growing up queer, Cuban, and punk in Miami (3rd edition)

written and illustrated by Cristy C. Road

96 pages, 5.5 x 8.5, $9.95, March 2017
Microcosm Publishing Distributed by Legato / PGW
2752 N Williams Ave
Portland OR 97227
microcosmpublishing.com
taylor@microcosmpublishing.com


This is the 3rd edition of Cristy C. Road's novel, described as a "testimony of survival" and "bursting with wild life, true heartache, sassy insight, righteous mouthing-off, desperate crushes, and more gasping laughter than a slumber party." The description sent along with the book covers it well: "In her Miami high school, Cristy Road valiantly tried to figure out and defense her queer gender identity, Cuban cultural roots, punk-rock nature, and mortality. Through her writing and illustration, Cristy reminds us of the strength and ability of punk youth to address realities like rape, homophobia, and misogyny. This book is no exception. Road's headlong story of growingup gives a voice to every frustrated 15-year-old girl under fire from her peers for being queer, butch, punk, or different." I loved reading this book; the illustrations are compelling and visually captivating, and the writing real and raw and fresh; I can totally see why this book is in the 3rd edition of printing. It's worth getting; it's beautifully designed and is a compelling read. Highly recommended.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

COPY THIS #32 (Oct 2016)


32 pages, 4 x 5.5 inches, cost?, trades ?

D. Blake Wertz
12339 Chesley Drive
Charlotte, NC 28277
bwertz@vnet.net

COPY THIS is an info/new zines assembled by and for mini-comics fans; #32 is almost entirely an interview with Larry Blake, which is really interesting to read. Be warned -- it's a tiny zine so the print is pretty small (the composition and visual flow are both very clear, so there's no confusion -- it's just printed small because of the size of the zine). There's also an upcoming all-art issue (which I think was due to come out in January), which I'd love to see. There's also a little bit of news in the back sent in by other minicomics folks including Andrew Goldfarb, Rob Imes, and a whole lot of others, including cover pictures of new projects. It's a good read and worth tracking down.

Three Acts of Wayne Countryman

(a collaboration by Eight-Stone Press and Leeking Inc.)
Dec 2016

68 pages, 5.5 x 8.5 inches $free (donations to cover printing and mailing costs are appreciated)

Davida and Patrick
PO Box 347
Glen Arm, MD 21057
davida@leekinginc.com


This tribute zine is a collection of pieces that Wayne Countryman, who passed away in September 2016, published in the storytelling zine Smile, Hon, You're in Baltimore! over the years. The three acts of the title include these pieces; the acts are divided into Writer, Photographer, and Friend. The photos are ones that were found after his death; they're compelling and evocative all on their own even without the context. This is a really moving tribute to someone who was clearly well-loved by those who knew him, and it's also a fine collection -- if you didn't know him (I didn't), you will really get a sense of how good a human he was and how much his sudden death shocked those people -- it is a profound loss that is evident in the Friend act, with all these tributes from friends and those who knew him.  Because it's Davida and Patrick, you know that this zine is going to achieve a level of quality and visual composition that is flawless; but because of the content, it really resonates as a beautiful tribute to a friend taken far too soon. Highly recommended; it's free, so send a few bucks to cover mailing & printing, but don't miss it.

Friday, April 21, 2017

Christian New Age Quarterly: A Bridge Supporting Dialogue

(Vol 22, Number 4, Summer/Autumn 2016)


28 pages, 7 x 8.5 inches $12.50 US (4-issue subscription), CAN/MEX / WORLD $18.50 (US funds only), trades ??

PO Box 276
Clifton, NJ 070015-0276
info@christiannewage.com
www.christiannewage.com


This issue is a double-issue ($7 for US, $10 outside of US, US funds only; usually a sample issue is $3.50 for US and $5 outside the US, same for back issues), and the masthead says that "Our intent is to foster communication between Christians and New Agers. To this end, a diversity of viewpoints is featured. Publication does not imply the publisher concurs with the content." There is a little bit of advertising in the back, and this issue seems mostly to be one long essay called "Proto-Mark: A Conjectural Reconstruction." There are footnotes, and if religion is your thing, this publication will likely be of interest to you. 

CRONES

review from Anne: CRONES


CRONES was made for GirlFrenzy to CroneFrenzy Supernormal 2016.
rachaelhouse@me.com
http://rachaelhouse.com/index.php

So, this is a tiny little minizine (1/8 size, so 2.75 x 4 inches) and it's awesome. This appeared along with a black rubber bracelet stamped with silver that says FEMINISTS COME IN WAVES  (brilliant, btw) in my pack of zines and I have no idea how much it costs or how you can get one, but I love it. It unfolds out to include drawn portraits of many important crones (there's a short poem explaining a little as the first page), including Jayne Country, Yoko Ono, Maya Angelou, Vi Subversa, and many, many others. It's lovely and I'm so glad it was part of my review packet -- I'd email Rachael House and ask for details to see how you can get one as well. Well worth tracking down.

SPACE WHALES TAKE ON CHAOS

review from Anne: SPACE WHALES TAKE ON CHAOS: Chaos is Our Queen #2 (#2 / July 2016)


16 pages, 5.5 x 8.5, $3 US, $?? CAN/MEX / $? world / trades: maybe

Eva Gonzalez
402 South Coronado Street
LA, CA 90057
eva.marie.gr@gmail.com
instagram: @chaosandfreegrit

The description sent along with this issue  -- "Chaos is Our Queen is a feminist response to our patriarchal society's demands to define, and thus limit, the female experience. This zine is created by two queer women, best friends separated by 3,000 miles in Hawaii and LA. It features original photography, art, poetry, and comics!" -- is really accurate. The issue has a full-color cover (front and back) and is mostly comics, which I dig, and it's def feminist, which I also dig. I haven't seen issue #1 yet and since this was from July of last year, there may well be more issues produced since then as well. The concept is neat, though; it's a zine produced by two folks who are far away from one another but share similar sensibilities. I'm looking forward to seeing other issues as well!

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Stovetop Girl: She's On Fire #5 

"Ballin' on a Budget" (January 2017)
4 pages, digest pages (5.5 x 8.5 inches), $1 US (not sure about CAN/MEX)
Kari Tervo
POB 7831
Beverly Hills, CA 90212
beehate2013@gmail.com
trades? "ask first"
www.etsy.com/shop/SweetMayhemZinery

"Wanna live the luxe life but you don't have a ton of cash to throw around? In Stovetop Girl #5, I clue you in on some ways to score cool party stuff for cheap, save money for expensive items and events, and get incredible discounts on fancy items and experiences. Stovetop Girl #5 is just a measly buck, so you're already spending smart!" This is part of a longer series that also includes the lottery, 90s relics, and so forth; the description is pretty accurate -- it's tips and tricks and photos of things scored on the cheap. Coupons are good! Thrift stores are awesome!  This issue includes pictures of things the author scored on the cheap as well. 

Friday, April 14, 2017

aw yeah BROOKLYN! (#95 and 95.5)

review from Anne: BROOKLYN: (#95 and 95.5)

24 pages, 5.5 x 8.5 $10 for a 4 issue subscription
(PAYMENT IN CASH! Fred adds: US currency please!)
Fred Argoff
Penthouse L
1170 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn NY 11230

If you're new to BROOKLYN, here's the details:  
“The name of this zine is BROOKLYN and that's also what the zine is about, Fred's beloved borough of Brooklyn." Issues generally tend to be more photography based, which gives you a real sense of a lot of hidden or off-the-beaten-path Brooklyn. If you dig history, architecture, urban spaces, etc. you'll absolutely want to check out this series. BROOKLYN is a long-standing series that's an intersting read even if you're never been to Brooklyn and maybe never will. It's all about Brooklyn (no surprise there), but it's always a combination of history, photography, and other Brooklyn related things, including Brooklyn-related zazzle.com stamps. Fred obviously spends a lot of time sweating the details, and the overall effect is very cool. 

Overall, it's a fun read (whether you're from Brooklyn or not), and there are subscriber perks (like the special issues, which 95.5 is, including a Brooklyn 13 tour, Brooklyn trolleys, and Brooklyn baseball.).  Issue #95 is entirely devoted to Red Hook, and includes my favorite feature (the Brooklyn Lexicon) as well as an excursion on the Brooklyn World Tour. I'm always a little amazed that there's SO MUCH to write about with Brooklyn, but it's all interesting. The layout is crisp and easy to follow, and it's delightful to read about Brooklyn from someone who obviously loves the place. Always, always a fun read worth your time. So, whaddya waitin' for? Read some Brooklyn already!

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

NON MONOGAMY 101

A primer for questioning compulsory monogamy

38 pages (some blank), 4 x 5, $5 US, (does not include s/h) $?? CAN/MEX / $?? world, FREE, ?? to trades
Adelaide Barton
Troy NY 12180
ladygardens00@gmail.com
Sold at ladygardens.etsy.com (start here for ordering)

This zine is pretty much exactly what it describes itself as: a primer for questioning compulsory monogamy. It's an illustrated introduction. It's a beginning resource guide, including a glossary, further reading, and definition of terms, plus a works cited page, so you can do some further reading and research on your own. The zine composition is clear and easy to read; it's handwritten and legible, and there are illustrations as well. If this is subject matter that's interesting to you, this zine is very much worth a read. It covers a lot of topics within non monogamy, fields a few questions, and overall gives a good introduction to the topic. Worth checking out.

Souvenirs From Weirdos #1 (2016) and KID COVERS


Souvenirs From Weirdos #1
by Cat Raia
22 pages, color cover, 8.5 inches x 5.5 inches, $5 US, $7 CAN/MEX/World, no trades

 

KID COVERS (Spring 2014)
by Karl Noyes
22 pages, all color, 8.5 inches x 5.5. inches, $3 US, $7 CAN/MEX/World, no trades


contact for both: Karl Roosterhouse
3052 Elliot Ave
Minneapolis, MN 55407
zineia.com or roosterhouse.org

Both of these came in from Karl Roosterhouse, but they're very different zines. Souvenirs from Weirdos is a non-fiction illustrated travel journal through Europe, and Kid Covers is a collection of book covers created by children (don't believe the cover! It looks like it's for a book called Next Door by Ruth Harden, but it's not!). It's actually a found-art zine from a closed school, where the author says he "found these in a pile of discarded books. The covers were created by students of the schools." There's some you'd expect, like Peter Pan, Father Brown Mystery Stories, and some others, but there's one for the Fisherman's Field Guide and The World of the Grizzly Bear (it's all claw, let me tell you). Souvenirs from Weirdos, which has cool color covers from what looks like a print or woodblock, and is printed on heavier card stock, and it's a travel journal with illustrations. "The following is the first installment of the zine ... an in depth travel log of my time spent hitchhiking from Berlin, Germany, to the Sahara Desert in Morocco and back over two months during my time spent living abroad in 2014." It's a much heavier read than than KID COVERS, but it's interesting. If you're into travel journals, you'll be interested. I don't know about the rest of the series, but Roosterhouse seems to be a collective or distro with these and other titles, and the website has clear design and a range of titles.

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

NEW HEARTS, NEW BONES #21

review from Anne: NEW HEARTS, NEW BONES  (#21 / Spring 2016)

22 pages, 4 x 5, $0 US, $0 CAN/MEX / $0 world, FREE, yes to trades
Stephanie Renner / Cheering and Waving Press
1553 Monmouth St. Apt D 
Lancaster OH 43130
cheeringandwavingpress@gmail.com


A clear and accurate author-written description for this zine: "current state of affairs in USA through a social justice lens." It's a cut & paste style zine that touches on wealth and politics with a generally clean and clear layout and includes links for folks to read more (it's tough to get very in-depth with gigantic issues in a short zine, so including other resources makes a great deal of sense). There's references to spoken word pieces and the issue also reproduces some of Chelsea Manning's writings. Overall, it's worth checking out.

King-Cat Comics #76

KING-CAT COMICS #76

32 pages, digest pages (5.5 x 8.5 inches) , $5 ppd in USA
John Porcellino
PO Box 142
South Beloit, IL 61080
trades? better write and ask first
www.spitandahalf.com

"Here's the new King-Cat! (IT'S A WEIRD ONE)" ends the introduction to #76, and he's not wrong.  The previous issue of King-Cat is all about Maisie, the author's late cat (it's really good and worth your time to track down), and this one is sort of back to the regular not-themed content; some drawings and some retellings, some travel and some snow; lots and lots of letter pages. As always, the layout is clean and crisp, and the line drawings are lovely. If for some reason you've missed King-Cat until now, it's well worth your time to start reading (and you can get subscriptions! more info is available through the address above.) There's also a King-Cat Top 40 in this issue, which is delightful. All in all, I'm always excited when these issues appear in my mailbox; it's worth your time to check it out. (And 76 issues is nothing to sneeze at either!) 

ASK A CAT

review from Anne: ASK A CAT  (2015)

24 pages, 5.5 x 8.5 $2 US (? CAN/MEX / ? world), no trades
Charles Brubaker
247 Redbud Cir.
Martin, TN 38237

The description for this book is pretty accurate and straightforward: "A collection of "Ask A Cat" comic strips. A cartoon cat answers letters sent in by readers." The questions range from the existential ("meow meow meow meow?") to the specific ("What should I make for dinner?") to the hilarious ("What should we do with a drunken sailor?"). You can get it on the fun by emailing cbrubaker@gmail.com with your Ask A Cat questions as well. It's a quick read but it's fun-- possibly not for all ages (there's a few no-pants jokes) but that's up to you. I'm not sure how long it's been going on or if this is the most recent edition (most of the strips are dated 2014 and the collection's dated 2015) but cats are rad and it's a quick, fun read.

aw yeah BROOKLYN! (#90 and 92)

review from Anne: BROOKLYN: (#90 and 92)

24 pages, 5.5 x 8.5 $10 for a 4 issue subscription
(PAYMENT IN CASH! Fred adds: US currency please!)
Fred Argoff
Penthouse L
1170 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn NY 11230

You know it, you love it: “The name of this zine is BROOKLYN and that's also what the zine is about, Fred's beloved borough of Brooklyn."Issues generally tend to be more photography based, which is cool since Fred has a great eye for capturing slice-of-life images. There's a whole lot of fascinating Brooklyn history ("no such thing as too much history!") packed into every single issue,  so if you like history, architecture, Brooklyn, urban spaces, etc. you'll absolutely want to check out this series -- aaaand I'm pleased to report that the lexicon, one of my favorite things about this series (i.e. You haven't subscribed yet? Wat the hell? You crazy, or wat?), appears again in #92.  
Did you know Jell-O was invented in Brooklyn? Me either! Three states have three Brooklyns each (#90 will hip you to them; one of them is in fact NEW YORK), and two states have two.  Brooklyn MANIA!!!

If you're new to all this, you should know that BROOKLYN is a long-standing awesome series that's a fun read even if you're never been to Brooklyn and maybe never will. It's all about Brooklyn (no surprise there), but it's always a combination of history, photography, and other Brooklyn related things, including Brooklyn-related zazzle.com stamps. Fred obviously spends a lot of time sweating the details, and the overall effect is very cool. I've been reading for a while now and I really enjoy it; I'd very much recommend a subscription to get the full effect & a full dose of BROOKLYN. (Please note: Fred wants you to pay in US cash!) Overall, it's a fun read (whether you're from Brooklyn or not), and there are subscriber perks (like the special issues). The layout is crisp and easy to follow, and it's delightful to read about Brooklyn from someone who obviously loves the place. Always, always a fun read worth your time. So, whaddya waitin' for? Read some Brooklyn already!

Monday, April 18, 2016

Escapist Artist Zine

review from Anne: a whole heap of Escapist Artist Zines

The Escapist Artist Zine Presents: "Color a Comic Coloring Book" (Sept 2015)
$2 US, $3 Can/Mex, $4 World, trades OK, 14 pages
Digest size (8.5 x 5.5)

The Escapist Artist Zine Presents: "Comedians Coloring & Activity Book" (Sept 2015)
$2 US, $3 Can/Mex, $4 World, trades OK, 20 pages
Digest size (8.5 x 5.5)

The Escapist Artist #23 (Nov 2014)
$2 US, $3 Can/Mex, $4 World, trades OK, 16 pages
Digest size (8.5 x 5.5)

The Escapist Artist #32 (Sept 2015)
$2 US, $3 Can/Mex, $4 World, trades OK, 20 pages
Digest size (8.5 x 5.5)

all available from
Jolie Ruin
625 West Division St
Union City, IN 473990
MrsNoggle@yahoo.com
TheEscapistArtist.Etsy.com

So, obviously, you can see the thread that runs through these: Jolie digs comedians. The "Color A Comic" coloring book has 6 different comedians repeated twice (including Amy Schumer and Margaret Cho) that were drawn by her husband Jamie and compiled into a book. Similarly, the "Comedians Coloring & Activity Book" has drawings to color in, mazes, dot-to-dot, and other things. Obviously, these are not for kids and aren't kid safe (think boobs and middle fingers and the like), so, you know, heads up. If you like comedy, these are totally for you.

The Escapist Artist is Jolie's personal zine, in which she writes about "racism, comedy shows I've gone to, details on the comedy zine I'm starting and the centerfold is coloring pages of Amy Schumer and Margaret Cho from the comedian coloring book collaboration with my husband Jamie!" #23 is an interview issues where Jolie interviews Sophie McMahan of "You Were Swell" and comedian Dave Attell. (The copy I got for review was missing pages 3-4 and 17-18, so there might be more to mention that my copy didn't have!)

All of her work is on Etsy along with other art, stickers, and lots of pins. Jolie's work is old school cut & paste, so TEA has a classic "zine feel" to it. If you're into that, you'll dig The Escapist Artist.

Sunday, April 17, 2016

review from Anne: "What's Up, Grim?": Haunted Hayriders In Their Own Words (October 2015)

54 pages, 5.5 x 8.5, $8 US, ? Can/Mex, ? world
white text on black ink with B&W photos and diagram

Adam Finchler
210 Cook St #302
Brooklyn NY 11206
www.adamfinchler.com
ginkner.bigcartel.com

The description that arrived with this book is both pretty straightforward and accurate: "This is a book of actual quotations recorded by the Grim Reader at a haunted hayride in New Jersey. Hundreds of off-the-cuff remarks made by haunted hayriders to Death and his legion of creeps are entombed in this sickening volume."

I'm not sure if I'd classify it as "sickening" but mostly the quotations fall into the "you're cute" category (mostly from teenage girls to the dude dressed up like the Grim Reaper) or into the "WTF" category (people apparently say all kinds of terrible stuff when they don't think people are listening, and there's some terrible stuff in here). People say all kinds of boneheaded things, apparently. The book itself is pretty slick: it's white text on black ink, so it's pretty appropriate for spooky stuff (and might explain the $8 cost as well). Information provided wasn't clear about trades or costs other than the US, so email and ask if you're interested; apparently you can also get the Grim Reaper to sign your copy if you're so inclined.

My favorites:

"He's from Star Wars.
No, he's the Grim Reaper.
I know he's the Grim Reaper!" -- 20 year old girls

"It's 70 degrees out. Last year I was freezin' my nuts off, now I'm sweatin' my ass off." -- Zombie Clarence

so much BROOKLYN! (#91 and 91 1/2)

review from Anne: BROOKLYN: (#91)

BROOKLYN --Special Issue: Signs of the Times (#91 1/2)

24 pages, 5.5 x 8.5 $10 for a 4 issue subscription
(PAYMENT IN CASH! Fred adds: US currency please!)
Fred Argoff
Penthouse L
1170 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn NY 11230

You know it, you love it: “The name of this zine is BROOKLYN and that's also what the zine is about, Fred's beloved borough of Brooklyn."Both of these issues are mostly photography based. There's a lot of Brooklyn history here,  If you like history, architecture, Brooklyn, urban spaces, etc. you'll want to check out this series -- aaaand I'm pleased to report that the lexicon, one of my favorite things about this series (i.e. You haven't subscribed yet? Wat the hell? You crazy, or wat?), appears again in #91.  


If you're new to all this, you should know that BROOKLYN is a long-standing awesome series that's a fun read even if you're never been to Brooklyn and maybe never will. It's all about Brooklyn (no surprise there), but it's always a combination of history, photography, and other Brooklyn related things, including Brooklyn-related zazzle.com stamps.  I've been reading for a while now and I really enjoy it; I'd recommend a subscription to get the full effect & a full dose of BROOKLYN. Overall, it's a fun read (whether you're from Brooklyn or not), and there are subscriber perks (like the special issues). The layout is crisp and easy to follow, and it's delightful to read about Brooklyn from someone who obviously loves the place. 
Always, always a fun read worth your time. So, whaddya waitin' for? Read some Brooklyn already!

STRATU'S DIARY COMIX

review from Anne: STRATU'S DIARY COMIX (Oct 2015)



10 pages,  11 inches x 8 inches, 3 US /3 Can/ 3 Mex / 3 World. Trades for comix
color cover, B&W inside with some color pages
Stuart Stratu
PO BOX 35 Marrickville NSW 2204 AUSTRALIA
sstratu@gmail.com

This is a diary comic in "about my real life" writes the author & artist. "Just like a diary, but with drawings!"  It's part of a longer series, which I've written about before, and this issue covers all of October. These are daily three-panel strips (well, except for one -- okay, two --  illness-fueled long weekends). Beer and crossword puzzles are frequent in the diary comics (including new vocabulary words, like "shebeen"), and the challenge as far as I understand it, is for one year's worth of daily comics. You gotta hand it to someone who gives it a try; I absolutely can not do any daily anything that involves comics (believe me; I have tried) or drawing or any of that, so it's neat to see how this comic is developing. It's a lot to tackle (as evidenced at one point where Stratu yells "I"m three weeks behind with my diary comics!" and his partner-in-challenge says that he's only TWO weeks behind...).  It's a fun read and worth checking out if you like diary comics. 

Sunday, October 4, 2015

STRATU'S DIARY COMIX

review from Anne: STRATU'S DIARY COMIX

8 pages,  11 inches x 8 inches, 3 US /3 Can/ 3 Mex / 3 World. Trades for comix
color cover, B&W inside with some color pages
Stuart Stratu
PO BOX 35 Marrickville NSW 2204 AUSTRALIA
sstratu@gmail.com

Pretty straightforward title: this is a diary comic made up of three panels a day. "My comix pal David Puckeridge and I tried this back in 2013 but quit after six months. This time we're going for a whole year -- Jan 1 to Dec 31 2015! (And beyond? Maybe ... if it doesn't kill us...). This issue covers April -- all of April -- which involves crossword puzzles, a dashboard camera and a betting brother, driving around, zines and getting the mail, a sakura flavored Kit-Kat from Japan (!!!), among other things. It's really cute, and different from many of the other diary comics I've read. It's day to day stuff, which I like. It's fun, and I enjoyed reading it. I haven't checked, though, to see if Stratu kept going with the diary comics -- the original plan was to go for a year, so we'll see if there are other issues out there...!

Saturday, October 3, 2015

King-Cat Comics #75

KING-CAT COMICS #75

48 pages, digest pages (5.5 x 8.5 inches) , $5 ppd in USA
John Porcellino
PO Box 142
South Beloit, IL 61080
trades? better write and ask first

This issue of King-Cat is all about Maisie, first met by Porcellino way back in March 1992. Porcellino moved in with friends in Denver and knew right from the start that this "tiny little black cat" was trouble (she kept biting his dad's feet while he crashed in the living room after the move) in the best kind of way. The issue is charming, and especially so if you've ever had a kitty in your life, retelling Maisie's original story (Maisie wasn't her first name), her taste for sabotage on Christmas tree decorations, her disagreements with dogs (short lived!), her last name (it's explained, a little, in the issue), wearing a harness and riding in the car to make it through a move, more dogs (not good), going for walks, and a romp in the rain!

There's more of course but I don't want to ruin the sweet story -- it's a lovely tribute to a best friend in kitty form. As some of you know, I have a wee boy here, a diabetic Siamese, so I dig what Porcellino is saying here. The issue's got a drawing of Maisie on the front and I sat down and read it with my kitty; it was well-paced and the layout is clean and crisp. If for some reason you've missed King-Cat until now, it's well worth your time to start reading. This issue's quite good, with a compelling and sustained narrative throughout. I loved it. And I won't tell you what happens -- you'll have to get the issue to find out for yourself about Maisie -- but needless to say, it's a great read & most highly recommended.

Friday, October 2, 2015

review from Anne: BROOKLYN: Special Issue: Abandonment IV (#89)

BROOKLYN --Special Issue: Abandonment IV (#89)

24 pages, 5.5 x 8.5 $10 for a 4 issue subscription
(PAYMENT IN CASH! Fred adds: US currency please!)
Fred Argoff
Penthouse L
1170 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn NY 11230

You know it, you love it: “The name of this zine is BROOKLYN and that's also what the zine is about, Fred's beloved borough of Brooklyn."

If you're new to all this, you should know that BROOKLYN is a long-standing awesome series that's a fun read even if you're never been to Brooklyn and maybe never will. It's all about Brooklyn (no surprise there), but it's always a combination of history, photography, and other Brooklyn related things, including Brooklyn-related zazzle.com stamps. This time, it's Zippy the Pinhead who apparently announced in an issue that he was born in ... you guessed it ... Brooklyn! (I wouldn't have gotten the reference without Fred's note cluing me into the fact!). I've been reading for a while now and I really enjoy it; I'd recommend a subscription to get the full effect & a full dose of BROOKLYN.

This issue is mostly photography based, as are many of the special issues. There's a lot of Brooklyn history here, along with some pictures of artist Miru Kim -- I'll let you get the issue to get the reference, though! If you like history, architecture, Brooklyn, urban spaces, etc. you'll want to check out this issue, even though the lexicon, one of my favorite things about this series (i.e. You haven't subscribed yet? Wat the hell? You crazy, or wat?), isn't included in this special issue. 

Always, always a fun read worth your time. So, whaddya waitin' for? Read some Brooklyn already!

Thursday, July 23, 2015

New Address!

To submit your zine for review please send it to:

PO Box 347Glen Arm, MD 21057

Thursday, March 19, 2015

NODE PAJOMO (Winter 2014)

review from Anne: NODE PAJOMO (Winter 2014)

28 pages, (1/2 page) 4.25 inches x 5.5 inches, 3 US /5 Can/ Mex / World. ?  trades. Cash (US or equivalent or unusued US stamps -- "stamps preferred!")
POB 2632 Bellingham, WA 98227-2632
Free editions of just listings available upon request. Listings due by the 15th of June and December
Issues published around first of July and January.
MAILART. ZINES. LIFE. reads the tagline for this zine, but there's a warning in there as well: "Herein you will find a ton of zine reviews, a few stone of audio reviews, and only half a kilo of mail art listings. The emigration of mail artists to the internet has been detrimental to those whose inclinations are exclusively postal. We understand the attraction of social media, but prefer it tangible not digital. Your mileage may vary." That said, there's a CD inside of this zine that's a collection of audio mail art as well as other inserts and other interesting things. I don't know if this zine will continue (it sounds like they aren't totally sure if they will as well, so...), but it's pretty interesting conceptually. If it IS the last issue, I would recommend that you check it out before it vanishes -- there's a little bit of everything in here, and it's worth a look.

COPY THIS! #10

review from Anne: COPY THIS! #10 (Dec 2014)

40 pages, (1/4 page) 4.25 inches x 5.5 inches, ? US /? Can/ Mex / World. ?  trades.
D. Blake Werts 12339 Chesley Drive Charlotte NC 28277
bwets@vnet.net


COPY THIS! is a compilation zine with an ALL ART issue planned for January. #10 is mostly a long and very detailed interview with Steve Lafler, but also includes and news & updates from people in the zine community about their various projects and interesting things that are happening...and it comes with rad trading cards! (I'll save the surprise, but if you like Steve Lafler, you'll totally dig the cards.). This zine is pretty straightforward and the layout is very crisp and clear, and though the interview is the bulk of the issue, it's really well done and specific. It's a lively interview and worth reading.

Monday, March 16, 2015

Cabildo Quarterly #7 / Dead of Winter 2015

review from Anne: Cabildo Quarterly #7 / Dead of Winter 2015


2 pages, 18 x 20 folded to pamphlet size, $1 US (Can/Mex ? trades ?)
cabildoquarterly@gmail.com
cabildoquartlery.tumbler.com
PO Box 784 Belchertown MA 01007

A short review for a short zine: poetry, short stories (very short), other items of note. More updates online; clean layout, no frills.  The construction might seem simple but the writing is interesting and intricate. There are worse ways to spend a buck and postage, folks. It you like it literary, check out this one.

BROOKLYN #86 and #87

review from Anne: BROOKLYN #86 and #87

24 pages, 5.5 x 8.5 $10 for a 4 issue subscription
(PAYMENT IN CASH! Fred adds: US currency please!)
Fred Argoff
Penthouse L
1170 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn NY 11230

OMG, SO MUCH BROOKLYN! More Brooklyn reviews! Say it with me, people: “The name of this zine is BROOKLYN and that's also what the zine is about, Fred's beloved borough of Brooklyn."

If you've been reading my reviews for a while, you should be pretty familiar with BROOKLYN by now. I love that these always appear in my mailbox and I'm always curious as to what Fred will use for stamps -- usually Brooklyn-related zazzle.com stamps. If you're new to all this, you should know that  Brooklyn is always a combination of history, photography, and other Brooklyn related things, and it's a long-standing awesome series that's a fun read even if you're not a NY resident.

#86 is a special issue. The Brooklyn Industrial Special Issue, thank you very much! There's some history, a lot of photography, and interesting facts. #87...is also a special issue! "When I was busy gathering material for the special theme issue about Bushwick, the possibility of a sequel was the furthest thing from my mind," writes Fred. "But, as often happens in the course of zine research, you never know exactly where it's going to lead. I wound up with more material than was necessary at the time. And then I thought, 'Well, since it's all here in one place at the same time...'" So in reading both back to back, you get a lot of information about Fred's favorite borough, but the neat thing is that BROOKLYN's at number 87! I can't imagine what Fred's got up his sleeve for #100!  #87 also includes the ever-hilarious Brooklyn Lexicon & Pronounciation Guide, which is totally one of my favorite things about this series. (i.e. You haven't subscribed yet? Wat the hell? You crazy, or wat?)

Always, always a fun read worth your time. So, whaddya waitin' for? Read some Brooklyn already!

Sunday, March 15, 2015

A VERY BRIEF HISTORY OF BUTTONS #1


review from Anne: A VERY BRIEF HISTORY OF BUTTONS #1


24 pages, 9.25 X 12.5, $15 US (shipping included)
BusyBeaver/net/button-zine.html


Honestly, this zine is one of the fanciest zines that's ever appeared in my mailbox. I've been a longtime fan of Busy Beaver buttons, and I love the idea that there's a button museum of rad buttons. This zine's an interesting, clever romp through the history of the pinback button (well, even before: the zine's got images of a historical Abraham Lincoln pre-button!).  Busy Beaver owner Christen Carter and production manager Joel Carter, who co-wrote the zine in collaboration, wanted to focus on how buttons are artifacts of cultural history. It's also got some pretty substantial production values: I know $15 sounds like a lot of money, and for most zines it is, but when you're looking at this and holding it in your hands, it reads more like a museum's exhibition catalogue. It's expertly designed and the captions are hilarious. It's a great read, especially if you're interested in history and material culture. 


Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Support is a Lot More than Bras and Jock Straps [introduction to Xerography Debt #36]

I’d been pondering the intro for this issue for a few weeks and was getting a bit nervous when my usual, “something will come to me” approach wasn’t working. The deadline for this issue was Sept. 15, 2014. So there I was, at the Bomba Estereo show in Philadelphia at 11:30pm on Sept. 15, not a word of this  introduction written, and not really thinking about anything when I had what Japanese Buddhists refer to as satori1, but on a much smaller scale. I had a sudden, unexpected, fully formed idea surrounding one word: Support.

The concert ended about 60 seconds later and as we emerged into the night air I told Patrick he had the first shift driving home because I had to write the intro to XD. Thankfully, as a fellow writer and editor he didn’t see this as aberrant behavior on my part. My love of spiders is another story.

Within the pages of this zine we’ve discussed time and again the ideas of community and supporting zines. This zine’s very essence speaks to that. If we had a mission statement the word support would be used, probably more than once. But what does support really mean?

Oftentimes support is seen as strictly financial – buying zines or funding a Kickstarter campaign, but that isn’t always an option for everyone, nor the only option. In my eyes support is showing up at a reading or signing to support not only friends but any author or publisher you respect. It means writing a letter to say how much you enjoyed a new issue (or book). It means writing a review or telling other people about zines you admire.

I once went to a show where only a small handful (literally) of people showed up. The band played as if they had a full house. They earned twice my respect that night. Zines can be like that too. Often only a limited number of copies are published and if I am among that small audience I should be applauding loud enough for the writer to hear. We don’t do this in a vacuum, but sometimes it can feel like it.

In the last several months three writers I know have been dealing with some heartbreaking problems. I’ve attempted to offer support in the ways I can and see that other members of their respective communities are doing the same. Sometimes support comes in the form of just listening and other times it is wine and potato chips.

Support, like much of life, is about showing up. So show up and support in whatever way you can. It matters.

Davida

PS - Also, you should give Bomba Estereo a listen.

“sudden enlightenment and a state of consciousness attained by intuitive illumination
representing the spiritual goal of Zen Buddhism” — Merriam-Webster

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

FUSE #1

review from Anne: FUSE #1

16 pages, (1/4 page) 4.25 inches x 5.5 inches, $2.75 US /$3.25 Can/ Mex / World. No trades.
Lorna Watt
1515 Claremont Ave
San Mateo, CA 94402
fusethezine@gmail.com
www.facebook./fusezine

Basically, this zine's about yarnbombing -- described by the authors as " a yarnbombing zine celebrating public arts of self-expression through yarn."  Color cover, neat layout & design, and a really interesting editors' letter on the inside front cover. There are some cool pictures (including the Great Moments of Yarnbombing page about the very cool Daughters of Triton pieces) and some pretty cool ideas for yarnbombing (like wee chicken feet on mailboxes -- as well as a thaumatrope yarnbomb, so you're not actually tampering with mailboxes!) as well as a call to action to be part of a yarnbombing project. It's a neat little start for a first zine and I'm excited to see what they do next; both authors say that they're new to zines and while the zine has a little bit of a disjointed feel (word searches and such) it's overall well designed and has a really catchy layout. If you're into yarnbombing, it's worth checking out (and in hopes that the next issue will be twice as long as the editors get more into zinemaking!).

DUMP #2 (2014)

review from Anne: DUMP #2 (2014)


60 pages, 6 inches x 9 inches, $2 US/ $2.50 Can/ Mex / ? world/ trades maybe
David Robertson
15 Elie Avenue
Dundee, Scotland DD5 3SF, UK
d1robertson@hotmail.com
www.fredeggcomics.blogspot.co.uk

For starters, I can't believe this one's only $2. It's 60 pages, with slick bright red covers, and it's pretty substantial. It's a collection of the different comics that the author's composed (the title of the book comes from one of these stories, in which the main character works in a town landfill/dump), plus some collaborations with different authors (these are mostly one-page pieces written by the author and illustrated by other comics artists) and a 24 hour comic as well.These comics are black and white and they're straightforward and clear in terms of both image and flow. Again, it's a pretty amazing deal for such a well-printed title. It's a pretty sturdy thing -- a fast read, but it's a net collection of a number of various smaller projects. (Also, whoa, 60 pages!)